West News Wire: After a young woman named Mahsa Amini was called to an administrative office and fainted in the waiting area before being declared dead at a hospital, unrest has been reported across the northwest of the Iran during the previous few days. 

The Iranian government was accused of institutional misogyny in the narrative, which was seized upon by Western media. According to reports, she was detained because she wasn’t donning her headscarf (hijab) properly. 

This is possibly the most unexpected aspect of this tragic situation.  

Hafsa Kara-Mustapha, a journalist enquired about their hijab said. I saw a lot of young women in Iran who had very visible hair and only a loose veil covering their heads. In other cases, it was nearly a scarf they were wearing rather than a scarf, only designed to comply with the rules that apply in the country.  

Most told me that rules had been considerably relaxed in recent years. And yet the story of this woman is now a worldwide phenomenon. Social media is alight with details of this case, and calls to support the rioting now taking place in Iran are trending on platforms such as Twitter. 

Obviously, the narrative fits the mold of what established media sources look for when covering nations that don’t follow Western norms. The deceased was a woman of Iranian Kurdish ethnicity, and the authorities had deemed her clothing “unsuitable.”   

In other words, everything needed to incite western liberals and rally the usual NGO suspects to launch a smear campaign against the Middle Eastern oil behemoth.  

This tragic occurrence is being used to win important points against Iran at a time when western nations are scrambling to obtain gas amid the Ukraine crisis, despite an investigation being begun into the circumstances of her death and a senior official paying his respects to her family. 

It’s a tried-and-true strategy used by rogue regimes to sow discord in resource-rich nations in an effort to get their valuable goods eventually sold at a profit and under conditions that favor the buyer instead of the supplier. 

We’ve seen this so many times that it’s getting old, but the new generations of brainwashed millennials are still eager to join the fight and launch a sophisticated media campaign against Iran, believing in some strange way that their cries and jeers are for women instead of Western corporate giants.   

Untrustworthy non-profit organizations (NGOs) like Hengaw, whose financing and origins are unknown but whose website is housed in Finland, have been spreading inaccurate information about the purported police brutality. This in turn has inflamed an already tense situation and riots have erupted across the country. Police officials are being targeted and in one instance a policeman is said to have been set on fire by angry protesters.   

The United Nations, which is ineffective and frequently blind to crimes committed by Western nations and the Israeli regime, has ordered an immediate investigation into the case despite Iran being a sovereign country with the authority to conduct its own investigation. Western media is intensifying its condemnation of the incident. 

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United States is not really invincible: Iran

Zainab Essam Al Khazali, 15, was shot by US soldiers on September 20 in Baghdad, close to the notorious Camp Bucca, but not a single Western media outlet covered the killing, demonstrating once more that it’s not always about human rights. As has frequently happened in the past, causing unrest and destabilizing stable nations is what matters. 

The incident took place near the Abu Ghraib prison, which has earned infamy for being the spot where members of the United States Army and the Central Intelligence Agency committed a series of human rights violations and war crimes against detainees during the Iraq occupation of 2004.

The Iraqi Security Media Cell announced that they have launched an investigation into the murder, which was described as a “random shooting”.

Sadly, many Iranian expats are calling for further unrest from the luxury of their homes in the west, much like their counterparts in Libya and Syria did a few years ago, with the results we now know. 

It is important to note that the severe sanctions system placed on Iran has generated an economic crisis that is having an effect on everyday Iranians’ lives. In this environment, any spark can start a fire, which is what many Western cities can anticipate happening very soon as the cost of electricity continues to rise and food prices continue to rise. 

But as is frequently the case, London, Paris, or Washington ignore their own issues in favor of concentrating on those of other nations. 

France, for instance, always keen on interfering in any story involving Muslim women, fails to see the irony in having a current interior minister, Gerard Darmanin, investigated for rape. French women reporting a sexual assault will be dealing with officers whose boss has been himself accused of raping women. Still, French media is in frenzy over the case of young Mahsa, whose tragic demise is being grotesquely exploited for political capital. 

In Britain, where the longest-reigning monarch was buried with all the pomp and ceremony befitting the feudal era of the middle-ages, politicians remain blind to rising tensions on their own streets.  

State-owned media have been covering the thousands of people who came to pay their respects to the late queen, but their coverage was somewhat muted when it came to airing the unease with which many people across the country saw the unnecessary expense of a twelve-day funeral, when thousands are now unable to pay their energy bills and soon even their food. 

Distracting the public with meaningless tales about celebrities or even Iran may only work for so long, but it appears that the tried-and-true strategy still has some promising days in front of it. 

Iran has undoubtedly experienced numerous attempts at foreign interference and has only grown stronger as a result. Let’s hope the reported violence ends soon and that young Mahsa is able to rest in peace. 

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