West News Wire: According to a source, more than 18,000 Yemenis, including women and children, have died and about 30,000 have been injured since the Saudi-led aggression into the impoverished nation started in 2015.

In a report released few days back by the Humanity Eye Center for Rights and Development, it was revealed that throughout the 2,800 days of Yemen’s war, a total of 47,673 people had died.

According to the rights center, 29,660 Yemenis were injured, and 18,013 people died. 4,061 children were murdered and 4,739 were injured out of that total. 2,454 ladies lost their lives and 2,966 others were injured in the attack.

According to the center, in addition to 379 tourist attractions, 415 hospitals, and houses, the aggression also destroyed 1,679 mosques, 182 university buildings, and over 598,000 homes.

The center pointed to the infrastructure and certified that the attack aircraft destroyed 616 networks and communication stations, 2,974 reservoirs and water networks, 2,101 government institutions, 15 airports, 16 ports, 344 power stations, 7,099 roads, and bridges.

According to the well-known rights organization, the violence also hit 454 farms for chickens and livestock, 385 fuel tanks, 12,030 commercial buildings, and 407 factories. It claimed that during the conflict, 10,112 vehicles, 998 food trucks, 700 markets, 485 fishing boats, 1,014 grocery stores, and 425 gas stations were damaged.

The UN’s special envoy for Yemen, Hans Grundberg, raised the alert on November 23 due to a deteriorating economic and humanitarian situation in the war-torn nation, which is still under a punishing Saudi-led siege. The ambassador demanded that Riyadh and its coalition allies once more stop attacking Yemen. The international community and, more crucially, the people of Yemen expect to see a real commitment to a peaceful end to the crisis, according to the special envoy.

Millions of Yemenis have also been displaced by the war being waged by the Riyadh government, which has been receiving unceasing political, logistical, and armed assistance from Western nations. Nationwide starvation and infectious diseases have been spread by it.

By destroying the Houthis movement, the conflict aims to restore the former pro-Riyadh and west rulers of the poor nation of Yemen to power. But because of Yemen’s fierce opposition, the Saudi-led coalition has been unable to achieve any of its goals.

By the end of August 2022, there were more than 5 million internally displaced people living in Yemen due to the continuous, destructive Saudi war and deteriorating humanitarian situations in the Arab nation.

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There are 5,159,560 Yemenis who are internally displaced throughout 15 provinces, according to a confirmation made on Sunday by the Yemeni Supreme Council for the Management and Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs and International Cooperation. The organization stated in a report that there were 740,122 families who had been forcibly relocated.

According to the report, there were also 694,127 internally displaced individuals living in Sana’a, the country’s capital, as well as 944,916 in Hodeida Province, 791,147 in Hajjah Province, and 512,526 in Sa’ada Province.

Despite repeated requests for foreign organizations to take on their roles and responsibilities towards the displaced, 1,168,664 displaced people have not yet received relief, according to the Yemeni News Agency Saba, which obtained a copy of the report.

An official from the UN stated earlier in November that 17 million people still do not know where their next meal will come from.

Recent statistics show that two out of every three Yemenis today experience food insecurity. Yemeni women and children also have some of the highest rates of malnutrition in the world, with 2.2 million children under five needing treatment for acute malnutrition and 1.3 million pregnant or nursing women.

On October 10th, a short-term truce in Yemen came to an end after three extensions of two months. Due to the coalition led by Saudi Arabia’s continuous transgressions, it has not been renewed.

Since the Saudi-led campaign against the poor nation began in 2015, more than 18,000 Yemenis, including women and children, have died and around 30,000 have been injured. The Saudi-led forces have also demolished 598,000 dwellings, 182 university facilities, 1,679 mosques, 379 tourist attractions, and 415 hospitals and medical services.

Millions of Yemenis have also been displaced by the war being waged by the Riyadh government, which has been receiving unceasing political, logistical, and armed assistance from Western nations. Nationwide starvation and infectious diseases have been spread by it.

The goal of the long-running conflict has been to oust the popular Houthis movement and replace Yemen’s current leadership with the erstwhile allies of Riyadh and Washington. But because of Yemen’s fierce opposition, the Saudi-led coalition has been unable to achieve any of its goals.

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